.
I was quite content, beavering away on my own, but I gradually lost touch with the Flash community, became a little isolated. I think it was due to this that I didn't see the storm coming, didn't sense the change in the air. Even when the wind blew I thought Android would save Flash (hah!)

Your name, plus your original "web name/handle
Andy Foulds of the cleverly named AndyFoulds.co.uk

Your first web encounter, year etc.
After completing a graphic design degree I drifted for a few years.

For some reason that I've never quite figured out (beyond a certain fecklessness anyway) I didn't feel ready to sell all my time for money so I sold as little as I could to get by on.

I did various McJobs and traveled a fair few miles around the US, Asia and Africa, occasionally supplementing my meager income with freelance photographic work.

It was this photographic work that led indirectly to the web; a good friend of mine, Mike Slocombe, was an early exponent of the web and he suggested I put a portfolio online, save myself some legwork.

I enrolled on a web design course. This was in 1998. I hadn't so much as touched a computer prior to that.

HTML, JavaScript and Lingo were the main subjects but they also had Flash 3 on the machines. We got on well, very well, and I found myself spending more and more time immersed in Flash to the exclusion of the other disciplines.

Flash 4 appeared around then and yugop.com rocked our world, showing what was possible with the new-fangled 'ActionScript'.

I was offered a job before the course finished and that was that - goodbye freelance photography, hello web design.

What our readers might recognize you most for, when you first hit the web.
Whilst at my first job - Enron would you believe! - I carried on working on AndyFoulds.co.uk and to teach myself new skills I built little interactive 'amusements', visual puns, and put them on the front of the site.

These became very popular, a few of them going viral, and at one point my little site was getting over three million hits a month. Great for my Google ranking but pre-Google ads, unfortunately.

Your digital journey since.
I left Enron after a few months, well before it so spectacularly exploded, and went to Relevare with Jamie McDonald and Guy Watson.

This turned out to be another dead-end but the internet bubble was at it's peak, they paid us very well and Flash was king; conferences all over the globe, all very rock & roll!

When Relevare belly-flopped I got a job at AKQA and spent a very enjoyable, very hectic year working on big brand accounts with a good crew.

However in 2003 I quit and emigrated to New Zealand!

My partner is a kiwi, we were expecting and as it was an option, NZ seemed a better choice than South London to start a family. I also fancied a change, a change of scene and a change of pace.

I've been freelancing remotely - very remotely! - for agencies and my own clients ever since, working from home near the sea on the western fringe of Auckland.

What are you up to now.
I was quite content, beavering away on my own, but I gradually lost touch with the Flash community, became a little isolated. I think it was due to this that I didn't see the storm coming, didn't sense the change in the air. Even when the wind blew I thought Android would save Flash (hah!)

So much has already been said about the death of Flash that I'm not going to rake over those particular coals again but to those of us who worked with Flash on a daily basis it was always much more than just a tool. It was a playground and canvas as well and now that it's bleeding obvious that it's on the way out I do mourn it's untimely demise.

These days I spend my time elbow-deep in HTML, CSS, JavaScript and jQuery and I find my existing skills transfer and translate well. There are aspects of Flash I miss but there are also many new capabilities of HTML5 and CSS3 that I'm beginning to find very exciting.

So here I am now, still working from home surrounded by tree-ferns, noisy birds and a growing family - two daughters now - and ocean-swimming whenever I get the chance.

An old dog learning new tricks, still as excited by interactivity as the first time I set eyes upon 'Gabocorp' and 'NoodleBox' (Google them!).


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Andy Foulds, Then and Now
Andy Foulds, Then and Now



Flash Forward NYC 2000
Flash Forward NYC 2000



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