.

I have a friend that once told me: "Congratulations, man! You know, I have 5 Cannes Lions and still no FWAs. Be proud!"

Please give us a brief bio of yourselves.

Jesus:

Hi! My name is Augusto Correia. But people keep calling me Jesus. And they keep doing the same jokes about turning water into wine. I'm a senior creative integrated art director currently working at NBS (stands for no bullshit) which is part of the Dentsu Aegis Network. I previously worked at Artplan with theses guys. I remained there for 6 years.

Gui: 

My name is Guilherme Machado, I’m a creative copywriter. And I know that my name is hard to pronounce. So, you can call me Gui. I have been working for Artplan since 2012 and here I had the opportunity to create great stuff, this project is one of them. 

João:

Hello, my name is João Santos, a Brazilian-born Art Director and Integrated Designer based in Rio de Janeiro. I currently work at Artplan. 

What do you do for inspiration?

Jesus:

I like to be inspired by the problem we have to solve. Real problems come with great stories behind it. You just have to decide the best ways it can be done using this background.

Gui: 

My biggest inspiration is the work itself. So, I’m always studying and trying to look every opportunity as a chance to do something great. 

João:

For me, inspiration comes in many ways.It can come from people, places, movies, music, books. My "creative baggage" is made of hard work, study and life experiences.

What do you regard as being your biggest achievement?

Jesus: 

I was a Duke Nukem 3D state champion here in Rio de Janeiro when I was 14 or 15 years old. There were 350 competitors. We fought in 5 players battles. The top 2 of each battle passed on to the next level. The rest was eliminated. I was the top 1 in every battle until the last one. And I was also the top 1 in the end. The horrible plastic trophy I earned is still on my shelf. Top that, bitches. Hahahah

Gui: 

My wife. And I’m not kidding. 

João: 

2015 has been a really cool professional year. The project Class of Classics certainly helped on that matter. The public acceptance, the shortlist at Cannes and, of course, being in the FWA is a professional dream come true.

How many hours do you work each week?

Jesus:

More than we should. Nobody is gonna die if a miserable piece of work needs another day to be done.

João: 

Normally 40 hours. When I'm involved in projects such as the Class of Classics, we spent over 60 hours working week.

If you weren't working on the internet what would you be doing?

João: 

Something on the visual arts. I always liked to design posters. Whether for cinema, music, social causes. The problem is that this is a very small market in Brazil.

Or maybe something related to animated movie.

What's your favourite part of your job? What's the hardest part of your job? What do you do when you get stuck?

Jesus:

I really like when it's finished. When we have a product of thinking. It's like having a tangible proof of what you were capable of thinking. The hardest part is when you know you have to begin the whole circuit again. It's hard to get things done. It's painful. 

I was active during the concept creation of the idea. This is in fact a second execution under the same insight we used on its last incarnation. Watch here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AoT13m8-Kxo

But I moved to another agency before it was finished. It was hard for me to be away in this critical part of the work but I was relieved they're taking care of it. Theses guys did a lot of hard work to achieve the beautiful result we had. 

Gui:

I really love what I do. I’m paid to be creative. Tell me, what could be more wonderful than this? 

João: 

The process of designing the screens, to think about architecture and user experience is extremely fun. In the Class of Classics project I shared this process with a young talent of my team called Igor Hermes. In addition, I was responsible for the illustrations and visual identity, another reason that makes the project special for me.

The difficult part is to manage expectations and quality of ideas, because of the short deadlines and budget. This is a situation that, only with great market experience, you learn to deal with.

How many projects does your company juggle at any one time?

João: 

During production of the Class of Classics I was working in two other projects. I also lead a digital team at the agency.

Who do you rate as being the top 3 design companies?

João: 

I really like the work of R/GA because the guys can have great ideas and still produce with impeccable design.

Also AKQA and North Kingdom.

Has winning FWA awards helped you in any way?

Jesus: 

I have a friend that once told me: "Congratulations, man! You know, I have 5 Cannes Lions and still no FWAs. Be proud!"

FWA was always THE reference for great digital work. It's not biased and judgement is completely independent (judges don't know each other). It's also one of the hardest awards to win. This is my 3rd FWA. And it's an honor.

Gui:

It's the prove that we are doing the right thing. I mean, every creative wants to do great work and then be recognized for it. So, winning FWA is one of the most important steps in any creative career.

João: 

The opportunity to show my work to a worldwide audience. It's amazing! FWA has always been a reference in my career.


When dealing with major clients, how difficult is it to meet the needs of such wide target audiences?

Jesus: 

The problem is not to meet the needs of wide target audiences. The problem is to meet the needs of a singular small target: the client. Shit works comes from shit clients with shit agency's client management. In the end it's all about fear and personal opinions, not the WORK itself. And there lies all the problems. Also, the bigger the company, more layers of approval. It's much better when you can talk directly to the person who decides.

Have you written any books, if not do you plan to?

Jesus: 

I have some plans. There's a lot to be said about our industry. A lot of shit must hit the fan.

Gui: 

The best skill of a copywriter is the power of synthesis. Thus, I’m able to write just the foreword, nothing else.

Are there things you do OUTSIDE of work to ensure that you are in the right mindset to be creative and/or successful in whatever you are doing?

Jesus: 

Things must be balanced. When it's calm at work, I tend to find a lot of activities outside of work. When it's tense here I tend to do absolutely nothing outside of work. There should always be a contrast between the scenarios in order to remain calm and prepared.

What was the last digital effort you saw (or were a part of) that used social media in a way that really made sense. Why?

Jesus: 

This is not a new work but it's something I'm really envy about. It's the "Book Burning Party" from Leo Burnett Detroit. It's so damn clever and spicy. Watch here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AoT13m8-Kxo

The web is getting out of the web. Do you find that thinking in digital solutions alone hinders you? Do you feel the urge to solve the problem using all mediums necessary?

Jesus: 

The idea is always in control. So I don't do things the way I want. I do things the way it's necessary. It can be solved using just one media. It can be necessary to use 5 different channels. 

Gui:

You know, there’s no more barriers between traditional and digital. We can mix up and create things using two or more platforms. But, our job is still about good ideas. If the idea is good and you use only digital, well done. Good ideas always gonna be powerful.

Looking 10 years in to the future, how far can websites go?

Jesus: 

I believe that we live among an overload of information. Due to this recent modern problem our tendency is to do less things in order to remain sane. Then I believe sites will be really really useful or really really really entertaining. There's no space for mediocre brand centered bullshit. 

João: 

I believe that sites with immersible experience, like Google Inside Abbey Road will be more common and rich in content.

Another point is the evolution of the user experience on mobile.

 

If you were a student entering this industry or an aspiring FWA award submitter, what advice would you give them?

Jesus: 

Study hard enough to have confidence in your work. You have to reach a stage that you know when things are perfect or when there's something that could be better. You MUST NOT depend on awards or other people to decide if a work is good. You have to be your own creative director and have balls to defend your work. Also, you will lose more than you will win. So, never stop trying. And try a lot.

Gui:

The most important thing in our business is how much you like it. If you love, you are in the right way. Now you just need to work hard, believe in your ideas and try to create your own criteria, not based on others. 

There must be a project that you have always dreamed of doing, what is it?

Jesus: 

I have a lot of ideas locked in my drawer. Some I never presented. Some were not approved or not executed due to complexity. But most of them were not done because of agency's laziness. It's incredible how people are afraid of doing great stuff. Some years later much of these ideas were done by other agencies, startups and other companies. I don't have a dream project but I'd love to work with people with enough balls and power to make things happen. If you need ideas, count me in. 

What are you excited about learning next and is there a long term challenge you are considering tackling?

Jesus: 

To say the truth, I live by challenges. I love to hear someone saying something is not possible. There's no better stimulant for me.

I have some long term challenges that I pursuit. But I can't  reveal them now. I'm superstitious. :)

João: 

I am studying issues related to futurism and singularity. The possibility of working with projects related to innovation to make people's lives better is fascinating.

Any parting shots or pearls of wisdom?

Jesus: 

Never respect established truths. 

João: 

In the difficult moments remember the teachings of Master Yoda:

“Many of the truths that we cling to depend on our point of view.”

“Patience you must have my young Padawan.”


It has been a privilege, thanks very much

Jesus, Gui & João:

Thank you, Rob! We love the feel of having our work among many other great works featured here in FWA. It was a great honor to speak with you! :) Cheers!


Links

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Augusto 'Jesus' Correia, Senior Integrated Creative Art Director -  NBS / Dentsu Aegis Network
Augusto "Jesus" Correia, Senior Integrated Creative Art Director - NBS / Dentsu Aegis Network

Guilherme Machado, Creative Copywriter - Artplan
Guilherme Machado, Creative Copywriter - Artplan

João Santos, Digital Creative Coordinator - Artplan
João Santos, Digital Creative Coordinator - Artplan

Class of Classics from Artplan - Mobile of the Day (July 01, 2015)

Classicals Behind the Classics. Previous work for the Brazilian Symphony Orchestra.

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